Centre for Advanced Study

at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

In focus

  • Fracture of tectonic plates in Tingvellir Park, Iceland. Photograph: Shutterstock

    Former CAS group leader wins the Fridtjof Nansen Award of Excellence

    Former CAS group leader Professor Trond Helge Torsvik has been awarded this prestigious prize for his outstanding work in geophysics.

  • CAS group leader 2017/2018 Trygve Helgaker and CAS board alternate Kenneth Ruud will lead one of ten new Norwegian Centres of Excellence (SFF) Hylleraas Centre for Quantum Molecular Sciences. Photo: Shutterstock

    CAS Oslo researchers will lead prestigious centres

    CAS Oslo congratulates former CAS group leader, future group leader 2017/2018 and CAS board alternate who will lead two different Norwegian Centres of Excellence (SFF).

  • X-ray showing a titanium metal plate hip joint implant in an adult patient. Implantable medical devices are becoming increasingly unsafe because of antibiotic resistance, the Young CAS group writes. . Photo: Shutterstock

    Announcement of our YoungCAS project 2017: The post-antibiotic era

    Antibiotic resistance is on the increase, with the consequence that infections that are harmless today may take lives in the future. This summer, a group of young researchers will gather at CAS for a project that aims to develop a new generation of anti-infective biomaterials for implantable devices.

Read

  • Spraps of things left by the Germans in the POW camps in Norddal.

    The heritage of war

    In autumn 1944, Norddal, in the north of Troms County, was occupied by German army forces in retreat. They had brought with them an unknown number of Soviet prisoners, who were distributed among four prisoner-of-war (POW) camps. When the war ended, the camps were abandoned and their stories almost lost in time.

  • Hansen's disease, hands of old man suffering from leprosy, amputated hands. Karen Thornber describes the disease as highly stigmatised in many societies, despite its being completely curable and not very contagious. Photograph: Shutterstock

    Humanities can help improve human health

    Karen Thornber argues that humanities can help improve human health and in particular can alert us to the need to tackle persistent stigmas against diseases.

  • Erlend Fornæss Wold and Berit Stensønes are group leaders of the CAS maths project 2016/2017 Photo: Centre for Advanced Study, CAS Oslo

    – Complex numbers make the world bigger

    Their mathematics is already used outside the mathematical sphere, from calculating an asteroid’s position to measuring the size of an iceberg, but Berit Stensønes believes it is only the beginning of the developments and applications of these powerful tools.

Listen

  • Robert Macfarlane went to Greenland in 2016, and found it difficult to articulate what happened in front of his eyes: a drastically changing landscape.  Photo: Helen Spenceley

    PodCAS #4: Robert Macfarlane: – We are the Generation Anthropocene

    April 6 2017 writer and scholar Robert Macfarlane gave the talk Deep Time, Thin Place And Thick Speech in the Anthropocene at Litteraturhuset in Oslo.

  • Glacier ice melting arctic

    podCAS #3: Glaciers retreat: - The mountain is sad

  • Professor Robert Losey analyzes dog skeletons in Siberia. Professor Losey is part of the CAS project Arctic Domestication in the Era of the Anthropocene.

    podCAS #2: Dogs and humans' long-lasting relationship

Events

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Air pollution in China: Poor people likely to be worst off

CAS researchers expect that the rural population and poor migrants in cities will be the hardest hit when it comes to air pollution exposure. Professor Mette Halskov Hansen hopes that the CAS project she leads can help raise awareness and promote debate.

Room for interdisciplinary engagement

The leaves on the magnificent trees outside our building here in Oslo have turned yellow and red—the tell-tale sign that the academic year is underway, Scientific Director at CAS Professor Vigdis Broch-Due writes.

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