Centre for Advanced Study

at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

  • Stephan Oepen (left) and Dag Trygve Truslew Haug, professors of informatics and classics, respectively, at the University of Oslo, during their residency at CAS Oslo. Photo: Camilla Kottum Elmar

    Meet the group leaders: Dag Trygve Truslew Haug and Stephan Oepen

    Today nearly everyone walks around with a device capable of translating the world’s major languages. But where some see opportunity, Dag Trygve Truslew Haug and Stephan Oepen, professors of classics and informatics, respectively, at the University of Oslo, see limitations.

  • Levi Bryant at Litteraturhuset event by Centre for Advanced Study/ CAS Oslo

    Talk by Levi Bryant: A critique of object-oriented philosophy

    In this talk, philosopher Levi R. Bryant talks about the history of speculative realism and object-oriented ontology. He then moves into a brief discussion of Graham Harman’s object-oriented philosophy, and an alternative vision he would like to propose.

  • Spraps of things left by the Germans in the POW camps in Norddal.

    The heritage of war

    In autumn 1944, Norddal, in the north of Troms County, was occupied by German army forces in retreat. They had brought with them an unknown number of Soviet prisoners, who were distributed among four prisoner-of-war (POW) camps. When the war ended, the camps were abandoned and their stories almost lost in time.

  • Robert Macfarlane went to Greenland in 2016, and found it difficult to articulate what happened in front of his eyes: a drastically changing landscape.  Photo: Helen Spenceley

    Robert Macfarlane: – We are the Generation Anthropocene

    April 6 2017 writer and scholar Robert Macfarlane gave the talk Deep Time, Thin Place And Thick Speech in the Anthropocene at Litteraturhuset in Oslo.

  • Robert Macfarlane in Greenland summer 2016. Photo: Helen Spenceley

    Articulating the Anthropocene

    We are Generation Anthropocene, according to Robert Macfarlane, who argues that our need for change seems to greatly exceed our capacity to make it happen.

  • In 2012, the Komafest art festival invited international artists to decorate houses in Vardø, Norway, to highlight some of the issues of depopulation. Photograph: Saphinaz-Amal Naguib

    Vardø’s rich street art scene: Will the city become an ecomuseum?

    In our first lunch-time seminar this spring, Professor Saphinaz-Amal Naguib took us to Vardø, Norway’s most north-easterly city, near the border with Russia. She introduced us to a rich street art scene that depicts the large-scale depopulation of this arctic city.

  • Hein B. Bjerck shared his reflections on the scorched things that survived a fire in his eighty-five-year-old uncle’s home in 2013. Photograph: Hein B. Bjerck

    Charred Memories: Ephemeral survivors in my uncle’s burnt-out home

    According to Hein Bjerck, cognitive memories of things in a home cannot be inherited, because they do not reside in the things themselves, but in the relations among things and personal mindscapes.

  • Graham Harman Philosopher

    Defining Things

    How do you define an object if not by its composition or usage? Contemporary philosopher Graham Harman presented his Philosophy of Things in an open lecture at Litteraturhuset in Oslo.

  • A recently abandoned apartment house in Nikel, Kola Peninsula. How does living with this ruining Soviet legacy affect the inhabitants, their prospects for the future, and how they remember the past, Bjørnar Olsen and his CAS research group asks photo: Bjørnar Olsen

    Life among Soviet ruins: – the past is still present

    Most people in Northwestern Russia and on the Kola Peninsula live in apartment blocks constructed during the time of Stalin, Khrushchev, and Brezhnev; many of these apartments are in a serious state of decay.

  • Savannah Georgia, pebblestones, Liverpoool, ballast

    Ballast: Loads with history

    Ballast, the material used to stabilize ships, is the object of study for archaeologist and CAS fellow Professor Mats Burström. He describes ballast in terms of being a ‘gigantic relocation of material’.

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