Centre for Advanced Study

at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

  • Glacier ice melting arctic

    Glaciers retreat: - The mountain is sad

  • Kavli prize winners 2016

    The Kavli Week 2016: honoring nine scientific pioneers

    September 6, the Kavli Prize honors the 2016 Laureates for their seminal advances in Astrophysics, Nanoscience and Neuroscience. The program of the Kavli Week also facilitates for dialogues on significant research in the fields of Astrophysics, Nanoscience and Neuroscience

  • Interdisciplinary

    2016/2017: From math to air pollution and archaeology

    Three new research groups are settling in at CAS, and we are excited to present highly diverse and internationally composed research groups.

  • Bears have solved some major problems in modern medicine, Professor Jon Swenson says, explaining that CNES, the French space agency, is interested in bear research because bears do not suffer from diseases relating to inactivity, but humans do. For humans involved in space travel, of course, the problem of inactivity is one that requires long-term study. Photograph: Shutterstock

    - Bears have solved major problems of modern medicine

    Bears increase their weight by fifty per cent during the autumn, and then they lie down to hibernate for six months. According to Professor Jon Swenson, who has been studying bears for over thirty years, a human who did this would never get up again. During our interview, Swenson explains why the Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), the French space agency, is interested in his data on bears.

  • Close up picture of a brown bear Photo: Shutterstock

    - Humans, not climate, cause extinction

    The CAS project on harvested large mammals is a significant example of how basic research can fruitfully, if unpredictably, enhance new knowledge across fields.

  • Filosofene Camilla Serck-Hansen og Frode Kjosavik

    Beyond the limits of science

    - We learnt from Kant that science has a tendency to go beyond its own limits, Professor Camilla Serck-Hanssen says. She is working on the oldest, most basic philosophical questions that to untrained minds might seem unanswerable. Together with Professor Frode Kjosavik she leads a metaphysical research project at CAS, pursuing questions that science cannot answer.

  • Professor Robert Losey analyzes dog skeletons in Siberia. Professor Losey is part of the CAS project Arctic Domestication in the Era of the Anthropocene.

    Dogs and humans' long-lasting relationship

  • Reindeer Norway Arctic

    Sense a different Arctic

    In the exhibition NyArktis, CAS researchers challenge portrayals of the Arctic as bare and without human’s presence, and experiment in new ways of presenting the region.

  • "An engaging love letter to ethnography"

    In The Times Literary Supplement CAS group leader Professor Marianne Lien's book Becoming Salmon, Aquaculture and the domestication of a fish is described as «...a masterly ethnographic study of mankind’s relationship with farmed fish».

  • Scientific Director at The Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) in Oslo, Professor Vigdis Broch-Due, and Postdoc Margit Ystanes recently published the book Trusting and its Tribulations: Interdisciplinary engagements with Intimacy, Sociality and Trust

    Book release: challenging the conventional wisdom about trust

    Scientific Director at CAS, Professor Vigdis Broch-Due, and colleague Postdoc Margit Ystanes want to introduce the complexities of trust in a debate they criticise as ethnocentric, abstract and limited.

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