Centre for Advanced Study

at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

Read

  • Bears have solved some major problems in modern medicine, Professor Jon Swenson says, explaining that CNES, the French space agency, is interested in bear research because bears do not suffer from diseases relating to inactivity, but humans do. For humans involved in space travel, of course, the problem of inactivity is one that requires long-term study. Photograph: Shutterstock

    - Bears have solved major problems of modern medicine

    Bears increase their weight by fifty per cent during the autumn, and then they lie down to hibernate for six months. According to Professor Jon Swenson, who has been studying bears for over thirty years, a human who did this would never get up again. During our interview, Swenson explains why the Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), the French space agency, is interested in his data on bears.

  • Close up picture of a brown bear Photo: Shutterstock

    - Humans, not climate, cause extinction

    The CAS project on harvested large mammals is a significant example of how basic research can fruitfully, if unpredictably, enhance new knowledge across fields.

  • Filosofene Camilla Serck-Hansen og Frode Kjosavik

    Beyond the limits of science

    - We learnt from Kant that science has a tendency to go beyond its own limits, Professor Camilla Serck-Hanssen says. She is working on the oldest, most basic philosophical questions that to untrained minds might seem unanswerable. Together with Professor Frode Kjosavik she leads a metaphysical research project at CAS, pursuing questions that science cannot answer.

  • Distinctions between nature and culture are artificial and not as sharp as they might seem, according to the CAS research group led by Professor Marianne Lien. What is culture in the Arctic, if it is understood as cut off from nature? Photograph: Shutterstock

    Where does nature end and culture begin?

    Through different stories about ways of living in the Arctic, Professor Marianne Lien and her research group at CAS challenge what they see as the dominant understanding of relations among humans, animals, and landscapes. What is culture in the Arctic, if it is understood as cut off from nature?

LOGO